Professional Landscape Photographer known for her unique, creative and evocative style based in the northern Scottish Highlands.

Posts tagged ‘Haida Filter’

Land of Mermaids Featured

Beautiful, mysterious wild & free. ~Dance in the moonlight. ~Choose imagination over fear & sea treasure in the simple things. Most importantly be who you are, embrace your inner Mermaid whether male of female it doesnt matter.

Jenny Cameron

Tell me you cant see the Mermaids?

Scotland’s best kept secret
Scotland
Island life
World-class beach, Scotland
Sanctuary in Scotland.
Power of nature in Scotland.
Land of Mermaid collection by Jenny Cameron 2020.

“All rights reserved” © Jenny Cameron 2020

Experiment with Haida Circular Polariser on Animal fur.

Since Covid-19 hit the UK in March this year and not being able to travel the same I’ve been thoroughly enjoying more animal portrait photography.

However, I’m constantly faced with issues of blown-out highlights on the animal’s fur. It recently occurred to me that it may be possible to utilise my landscape photography skills with the use of a circular polariser. For some unknown reason its something I’ve never thought about and instantly heightened my curiosity. It was now time to put my theory into practice.

To see the results take a peek at this video where I use the Haida M10 “drop-in” Circular Polariser.

 

Screen captures of raw files (straight-out-of-camera) for demonstration purposes with/without filter & final edit in Lightroom Classic.

blown out highs

Showing blown out highlights & weak histogram without a filter

Annotation 2020-08-06 185218

Histogram showing much more detail with the filter on & same camera settings as with no filter.

edited jpeg-1

Final edit in Lightroom Classic.

Techy info

Both images using Canon 5d mark iv, Canon 70-200mm F2.8 (ii) lens @70mm, ISO100, F4.5, 1/350.

To conclude-

For a more in-depth review & explanation of the Haida M10 “drop-in” CPL please take a look here . Also a video demonstration of me using the filter in the Haida M10 filter holder, watch here how easy it is..

All Haida filters are assembled in their own optical workshop located in the beautiful Port City of Ningbo, China. To view their official website please click here or alternately view their Facebook Page here.

I hope you found this useful & enjoyable?
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“All rights reserved” © Jenny Cameron 2020

The lone tree at Llyn Padarn

©Jenny Cameron 2019

 

This image named “Elemental” was taken last November in the Snowdonia National Park, Wales.

A picture can speak a thousand words, here’s what it says to me.

Over the years I’ve visited Snowdonia national park many times mainly from my hiking & climbing days with my Husband but also my Grandmother’s family are Welsh. As a child we used to get the train from Lancaster to Crewe where we changed to Prestatyn. The family lived in a small village called Dyserth in North Wales which happens to be famous for an impressive waterfall where the family lived at the top of over a hundred years ago but sadly got washed away in floods. My Grandmother & I always stayed at Auntie Ivy’s house then the rest of the local family would come to visit. I always remember the Welsh language being spoken by Uncle Len who happened to be a great local artist but also a bit eccentric. The female family members used to tell him to speak English as it was rude in front of the guests which never failed to amuse me. 

What happened behind the camera

Having to share my personal space with others, something I prefer not, although the photographers I met were extremely friendly. One photographer with a lovely Sony A7R iv made me laugh when I really shouldn’t have, you know when you get the giggles at the wrong time? He was saying “how typical that the water was so rippled when he’s seen many images on social media of this location with silky smooth water, how annoying it’s never like that for him”. I looked at another photographer I’d been chatting to, we couldn’t keep our faces straight. We politely explained it’s down to long exposure.

Zen moment

“Make your heart like a lake with a calm, still surface and great depths of kindness.” – Lao Tzu.

Techy stuff

I cant really share my exif data as this image was;

  • Focus stacked for ultimate sharpness.
  • Focal blend of foreground, mountains & sky for my visual impact.
  • Exposure blended for the overall look I wanted to achieve.

Haida Filter M10 round drop in ND 3.0 (10 stop) to smooth the water & clouds.

Post processed in Adobe Creative CloudTopaz DeNoise AI

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“All rights reserved” © Jenny Cameron 2020.

Haida filter video tutorial Featured

Haida Filter tutorial from my home in the Scottish Highlands during the COVID-19 lock-down. Sharing my thoughts about filters.

Please note; If using any of the 100mm x 100mm (square) ND filters in M10 filter holder and you don’t wish to use any of the round “drop-in” filters, you must use the M10 “drop-in” light barrier which is simple and easy to use the sealing ring to prevent any light leakage (also provided in the kit).

 

Haida M10 filter holder system including light- barrier

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“As a landscape photographer I have learnt how invaluable a great filter system is to my arsenal of tools. It’s something you can buy a bit at a time to build up your collection, but choosing the correct brand is the tricky part. Thankfully for you I’ve made the mistakes and now ready to share my thoughts from the past twelve months of using the Haida M10 filter holder system for the 100mm filter series. Such a genius method and design.”

Included in the Haida M10 filter holder kit

Filter holder, Circular Polariser, light-barrier, one adapter ring which can be purchased to fit most popular lenses in sizes 49, 52, 55, 58, 62, 67, 72, 77 and 82mm. Housed in a smart black eco-leather zipped storage case, with a handy carabiner attached to the top which can be neatly clipped onto your tripod or belt for ease of access, internally lined with a lovely grey velvety fabric with a net pocket for storage, including a handy screwdriver, extra pair of filter holder slots and gaskets to provide a third slot on the front of the Holder ) which I’ve left on permanently).

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Constructed from aviation grade aluminium and PC materials for super strength and is lighter in weight than its predecessor. Its genius design makes it exceptionally user-friendly, with super fast set up, and effortless to change and remove filters. Simply clip the M10 filter holder onto the M10 adapter ring by using the red push-and-release (spring clip) locking lever (see video & photos below). The innovative design gives a very secure and solid connection, and at the same time the ability to rotate 360 degrees. The non-slip spongued coating on the bottom of the filter holder provides a good grip whilst rotating which I think is a nice touch.

It’s designed to take up to three filters ( 100 x 100mm or 100 x 150mm @ 2mm thickness, compatible with other brands at the same size ) on the front of the holder if you wish to stack, and one filter slot at the rear closest to your camera lens where the new round “drop in” M10 filters are used. Boasting a choice of neutral density filters ( 3, 6, 10 and 15 stops), circular polariser (included in the kit), clear-night (light pollution filter), graduated neutral density filters ( 3 and 4 stops) and ND + CPL ( 3 and 6 stops). But only using one at a time which is the only downside if you like using several ND/s and a CPL together. If you don’t wish to use any of the round “drop- in” filters, you must use the M10 “drop in” light barrier (see photo below) which is a simple and easy to use sealing ring to prevent any light leakage (also provided in the M10 filter holder kit).

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Optional extra filter storage case

During 2019 Haida also released a very useful filter case for their M10 filter series or other branded filters of the same dimensions; either 100x100mm &/or 100x150mm. Holding up to nine filters including Haida M10 filter holder, adapter ring, cleaning cloth & memory cards. This has been with me on my adventures for every shoot, Id truly be lost without it. If you’d like to see more about this case please take a look at my test review showing photos & video here.

All Haida filters are assembled in their own optical workshop located in the beautiful Port City of Ningbo, China. If you’d like to visit their website &/or Facebook .

I hope this provides you some useful information. Please feel free to ask me any questions.

If you would like to see more of my work;
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“All rights reserved” © Jenny Cameron 2020

Glencoe collection

Clansman ( jpeg for web)

Clansman

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Bidean nam bian

Wanderlust re edit (jpeg for web)

Wanderlust

Glencoe (jpeg)

Greetings

Kingshouse

Kingshouse

Sona (jpeg for web)

Sona

©Jenny Cameron 2017

Euphoria

Glencoe (lge jpeg) (px500)

Spirit

Dreaming (jpeg for web)

Phoenix

©Jenny Cameron 2017

Truly

 

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Eternity

 

Haida Picture Appreciation – January 2020

Haida Picture Appreciation

On arrival the light was bouncing all over the place, it had been one of those typical Scottish days where you get all four seasons in one day, this can prove to be very successful for landscape photography as it seems to bring the purest of light, what I call “sparkling- light”. However, this can bring difficulties with light management -You need to be in control of the light, not the light controlling the image. To do this I used a Haida M10 CPL which is my go to filter to control highlights and Haida Red Diamond Medium 0.9 ( 3stops) which produced some real magic. The Callanish stones no matter how many times I visit never fail to make the hairs on the back of my neck stand up, there’s something very spooky but quietly spiritual about it, makes you think about the history which dates back to the stone age over 5000 years ago. The sky didn’t pop as much as I hoped due to the time of year and day time temperatures. I stayed till dusk watching the sun dip below the horizon, all very peaceful at such an iconic location.

lightroom without jpeg

Without filter -ISO 100, F11, 1/25

lightroom with filter

With Red Diamond medium 0.9 and M10 round “drop-in” CPL = ISO 100, F11, 1”3 sec @16mm

lightroom edited jpeg

Post processed in Adobe Creative Cloud

Camera settings Without filters = ISO 100, F11, 1/25 – With Red Diamond medium 0.9 and M10 round “drop-in” CPL = ISO 100, F11, 1”3 sec @16mm. Canon 5d mark iv, Canon 16-35mm L lens, Gitzo tripod & ball head.

I hope this provides you some useful information. Please feel free to ask me any questions. More info and my test reviews on Haida’s website.

If you would like to see more of my work;
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Hebridean headspace Featured

Born and raised on the west coast of England but never felt that inner something with seascapes the way mountains affected me.

However…the coastlines of the Hebrides have such a special type of light, it’s very different to mainland, almost purer, more magical with extra sparkles. The skyscapes alone are enough to make an exceptional composition of their own in a hauntingly beautiful manner.

Makes you feel like it’s got you snuggled up in the most fluffy goose down jacket in the coldest of winter. My eyes are peeled, constantly searching for pockets of light, unusual compositions, wildlife focal points, shapes/patterns. The diversity with its hidden coves, brooding skies, windswept moorland, pristine beaches, textures of the machir where orchids are known to grow, narrow twisty turvy roads and interesting mountains, such a feast for the eyes and a way to fine tune my compositional skills.

Highland cows, sheep and wild ponies roam the beaches and roads. Walks become slower the longer you stay. I’ve done all the tourist trap locations and now prefer to find my own hidden gems for more heart warming feelings.

When your photographing the same locations and even compositions as everyone else it can soon become unsatisfying and boring. Whereas when I find my own beauty spots I can put more emotion into the final image, inviting the viewer right into the moment along me. Post processing is more enjoyable as you find yourself with more creative licence which is something I do enjoy.

My images helped guide me. Life can be tough with many rocks in the road often leading to a bumpy ride. So, if your feeling gloom and down beat go chase some light, free yourself from the daily grime. Let your emotions rule your actions, don’t follow the rules, make them up yourself, listen to your heart.

Don’t follow the crowds, be who you are.. Be different, unique, your own person, don’t worry what others may think of you. Express your emotions, don’t be afraid of looking like a fool. You’ll probably find that most people will admire any faults as it proves your only human, we aren’t perfect.

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Clear Night filter by Haida

Introduction

I’ve been curious for some time now – If I’m being honest slightly sceptical – about whether the Clear Night filter actually worked and wanted to find out for myself if this filter really did what it claimed. Initially, I questioned why can’t you simply change the white balance in post production, what’s all the fuss about? Let me walk you through my honest, hand-on-heart evaluation of the Haida M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter.
Firstly, I’ll start by explaining a bit about the Haida M10 round “drop-in” filters which are dedicated to only the Haida M10 filter holder and released in January 2019. They come in a wide range of sizes to fit most popular lenses in sizes 49, 52, 55, 58, 62, 67, 72, 77 and 82mm. Boasting a choice of Neutral Density filters ( 3, 6, 10 and 15 stops), Circular Polariser, Clear Night, Graduated Neutral Density filters (3 and 4 stops) and ND + CPL combi ( 3 and 6 stops). Inserting the filter into the M10 filter holder couldn’t be easier, it simply drops between the holder and lens, creating a perfect seal from any stray light with its inbuilt light barrier. If you’d like to learn more about the Haida M10 filter holder please feel free to read my in depth test review and video click here. It’s almost like gravity does the work for you, so effortless – once you hear the click it’s locked in place.

If you don’t have the M10 filter holder but would like to try the Haida Clear Night filter, you can purchase the Haida Nano Pro 100 series Clear Night filter 100mm x 100mm, 2 mm in thickness, compatible with many of the most popular 100mm filter holders, including the Haida 100-Pro Filter Holder, and the Lee FK Foundation Kit Filter Holder.

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Location and Equipment

This test review was based on a couple of locations in the Scottish Highlands – Using my Canon 5d mark iv ( full frame camera), Canon 16-35mm F2.8 USM L lens, Gitzo tripod, Gitzo ball head and remote trigger. Although I was in a remote area with class one bortel for my seascape image there were still farms and houses dotted around which caused slight light pollution. The second image of the Church had extreme light pollution at the side of a busy main road and class four bortel.

How the Haida Clear- night filter affected my image.

My main goal in testing any filter will always be for neutrality and sharpness. I want it to replicate what my eyes saw without any strange colour cast which has been an issue for me in the past with a couple of other filter brands. I was experimenting with different exposure times without a filter to achieve the best focus and placement of stars to begin with but never completely happy. However, as soon as I popped on the Haida Clear Night filter everything changed and I was smiling from ear to ear. Instant clarity, almost like a polarising effect which replicated what I was actually viewing, incredible true to life colours and rid of the horrible warm tones which you can easily see in the raw files below. The sky appears clearer and stars intensify with the filter on. It significantly improved the optical clarity, contrast, colour and quality throughout the whole image not to mention unbelievable sharpness and no vignetting which made me feel elated. This was great and super easy to use combined with the Haida M10 filter holder which is a dream to use.

The Haida M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter made terrific improvements blocking the yellow sodium-vapor light which is the horrible yellow/orange coloured casts often generated from light pollution in the night sky resulting in a lovely cool tone which is something I prefer to portray on a cold dark night. This also made my post processing super easy and fast.

Design and construction

I particularly liked the design of the plastic holder that the round glass sits in, making it ultra easy to drop in and remove from the filter holder without any disturbance to the composition even with clumsy gloves on and numb fingers. Constructed from high quality optical glass providing the best ever clarity. Each filter has ten layers of anti-reflective coatings of ultra thin Nano coatings on both sides. Waterproof, meaning any built up condensation from the cold literally rolls off like beads with a quick wipe of a soft microfiber lens cloth, no ugly smears and also scratch-proof. Most importantly for me, preserves image sharpness, which let me tell you is second to none. As with all of the M10 filter range it has a built-in light gasket which seals to the M10 Holder and prevents any unwanted light leakage.

Images below showing straight-out-of-camera (Canon 5d mark iv and Canon 16-35mm USM L Lens) @16mm -With-without-M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter. No post processing on either. Demonstrating how the filter has retained every bit of sharpness and made the stars pop straight off the night sky with a stunning cool tone.

without-filter-for-review-(Tiff)

Without filter ISO 2500, F2.8, 20 seconds . With M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter ISO 2500, F2.8, 22 seconds.

                       Finally post processed in Adobe Creative Cloud.

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Location- County of Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

…………………………………………………

Images below showing straight-out-of-camera (Canon 5d mark iv and Canon 16-35mm USM L Lens) @16mm -With-without-M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter. No post processing on either and the same white balance on both.

without-filter-tiff

Without filter ISO 3200, F2.8, 15 seconds . With M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter ISO 3200, F2.8, 15 seconds.

                    Finally post processed in Adobe Creative Cloud

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Location – West coast of Scotland.

Where are the filters assembled

All Haida filters are assembled in their own optical workshop located in the beautiful Port City of Ningbo, China.

Where can I purchase this filter from

All the Haida equipment I’ve mentioned above can be purchased direct from Haida’s European distributor Haida Germany shop  for excellent service.

Conclusion

Overall this will remain in my filter case and used in absolutely every night sky I shoot. Im super impressed the way it added a further dimension to my night photography and would highly recommend to a friend. The M10 round “drop-in” Clear night filter is the perfect companion for night skies, don’t leave home without it. Thank you Haida for saving the day yet again for me.

I hope this provides you some useful information. Please feel free to ask me any questions. More info and my test reviews on Haida’s website.

If you would like to see more of my work;
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“All rights reserved” © Jenny Cameron 2019.

Test review of Haida Red-diamond soft GND 1.2 & Haida M10 round “drop-in” CPL+ND 1.8 combi

Introduction

Welcome to my test review of the Haida round “drop-in” Circular Polariser and Neutral Density 1.8 (6 stop) combination filter and Haida Red-diamond soft graduated neutral density 1.2 (4 stops).

If you enjoy landscape photography I cannot stress the importance of investing in a good quality set of filters. I’m well aware of what it feels like having a restrictive budget and fears of making the wrong decisions buying new gear. This is where I hope I can help by providing my hand on heart honest opinion. Haida is not the cheapest filters on the market but by no means the most expensive for the optical quality achieved, you really do get a lot of bang for your buck! We all strive to buy the best lenses so why scrimp on a cheap filter and ruin optical quality, it makes no sense to me.

Haida M10 round “drop-in” CPL+ND 1.8 (6 stop)

When Haida offered me the opportunity to test their M10 combination-filter with built-in light barrier I was intrigued, to say the least, questioning myself what the downfalls if any would be. Whilst stacking filters can work and something I do regular, however, this practice is not optimal for a couple of reasons;

  1. Forcing light to traverse through more elements, therefore more likely to get slightly refracted, possibly resulting in softness or even chromatic aberration.
  2. Increased risk of light flares.

The more I thought about it the more I couldn’t wait. Initially, I planned waterfalls for this particular test. Although I could see it being very useful after a midday rainstorm which happens a lot here in Scotland when the sun bursts out it’s great to slow down the exposure a wee bit and allow the filter to do the work. Rainfall hasn’t been great the past few days so I headed to the beach at sunrise instead.

Inserting the filter into the Haida M10 filter holder is incredibly fast, it simply drops between the holder and lens creating a perfect seal from any stray light. Oftentimes in the past, I’ve struggled with the issue of light leakage and had to resort to putting hats or cloths over the gap between filter and lens, not an ideal situation unlike any of the Haida M10 round “drop-in” filters such as this combi filter which have a built-in light-barrier.

from vid 2

Inserting filter into the rear of the M10 filter holder

This is an ND 1.8 filter meaning it will lose six stops of light. But don’t forget it has the added CPL which generally lose between 1-2 stops of light, collectively this will provide a total of almost eight stops. For me personally, I like a six-stop ND for moving water as it doesn’t blur everything to oblivion like say a ten stop would. A six-stop shows slight movement which I prefer to portray. A neutral density filter should be exactly what the name suggests “neutral” in every which way and let me tell you all the Haida NDs I’ve ever tested are all neutral, no crazy coloured undertones, no vignetting and no loss of sharpness from corner to corner. What you see is what you get.

If you’re not wanting the polarising effect you can simply rotate the small dial (three gear linkage design ) on the mount independently, very smoothly to reduce or completely remove depending on the scenario of the scene. Once you start turning, you’ll instantly see the polarisation intensify on your live view screen. I tend to always rotate a CPL 360 degrees first to check the availability of contrast, saturation, and reflection. The strongest effect takes place at an angle of 90 degrees from the sun, ie make sure your line of sight is perpendicular to the direction of the sun. The filter is easily removed or exchanged by gently squeezing the red plastic tabs on the top and lifting it out without disturbing your composition. The choice is all yours and easily very adjustable.

Image of raw file with a filter on, zoomed in 100% in Lightroom to demonstrate maximum sharpness of the rocks. It’s clear to see the quality is second to none, excellent detail even in the darkest of shadows at blue hour.

zoomed 100 percent )jpeg)

For this very demanding scene above with the bright sunrise and dark foreground, you need the best support from your gear. Let me tell you this filter made my job very easy, provided excellent control over the whole dynamic range, ultimate sharpness, no colour cast or vignette, and really made me smile. Constructed from high-quality optical glass, each filter has ten layers of anti-reflective coatings, scratch-proof, provides the best clarity, includes the famous nano multi-coating to reduce reflection, waterproof (meaning any droplets of water literally roll off like beads, no ugly smears) and the dreaded fingerprints wipe off easily with a soft microfibre cloth.

The M10 round “drop-in” filters are available in a selection of: ND 0.9, 1.8 3.0, 4; CPL; Clear-night; GND-0.9 1.2; ND+CPL 0.9 and 1.8.

Images below showing straight-out-of-camera (Canon 5d mark iv and Canon 16-35mm USM L Lens) @19mm -With-without-M10 round “drop-in” CPL+ND 1.8 combi. No post-processing on either, other than lens correction in Lightroom.

raw-without-(1-of-1)

Without filter = ISO 100, F14, 0.6 sec – With Haida M10 round “drop-in” CPL+ND 1.8 combination. = ISO 100, F14, 30 seconds @19mm

Finally post-processed in Adobe Creative Cloud

Fragil rock (jpeg for web)

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Haida Red-diamond soft GND 1.2 (4 stops)

Earlier this year I tested the Haida Red-diamond medium 0.9 (3 stops) read review which totally stole my heart since then it’s rarely been off my lens and I can’t wait to tell everyone how thrilled I am in using it. My love affair with this series only intensified, I had to try the Red-diamond soft graduated neutral density 1.2 (GND 4 stops) filter. Packed my kit and off I went to Aberdeen for sunrise to see how the soft grad stood up to the medium and let me tell you I was not disappointed.

The main purpose of a GND filter is to balance exposure in an image that contains a bright sky and darker foreground. As you can see from the photos below this filter is rectangle in shape and sized 100mm x 150mm, providing flexibility to move the filter up or down within the filter holder for ultimate control. Providing such a beautiful soft progression from dark at the top where you would place over the sky to clear at the bottom in a neutral manner and achieving endless creative possibilities.

What makes this series stand out from its predecessor and other brand filters are listed as follows:

  • Shock resistant, low risk to any accidental damage.
  • Scratch-resistant, the perfect partner in demanding weather.
  • Zero colour cast.
  • Waterproof, oil and fingerprint-proof Nanopro coated surface.
  • Improved optical glass.
  • R5 rounded corners – make it easier to slide in and out of the filter holder, no sharp corners.
  • K9 optical glass.
  • True colour.
  • Ultra-thin nano multi-coating.
  • Easy to clean.
  • Double the strength of other glass filters whilst at the same time retaining ultimate sharpness.
  • Still retaining 2 mm in thickness making it compatible with the Haida 100-Pro filter holder and other brands the same size.
  • The Red Diamond series is double the strength of a normal glass filter. You may have seen online the Haida Red Diamond drop test video? Where it’s thrown onto a concrete floor and no sign of damage to the filter. If you are accident-prone this would be the perfect filter series for you.

Images below-showing straight-out-of-camera (Canon 5d mark iv and Canon 16-35mm USM L Lens) @35mm with no filter and with Haida Red-diamond soft GND 1.2 (4 stops). No post-processing on either other than lens correction in Lightroom. As you can see the soft GND significantly transforms the quality of the image.

with-without-filter-(-gif)-May-2019-Dunnottar

Without filter = ISO 100, F10, 1/20 – With Haida Red-diamond soft GND filter 1.3 = ISO 100, F10, 0.8 seconds @35mm.

Finally post-processed in Adobe Creative Cloud

final edit (jpeg)

Sunrise over Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.

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All Haida filters are assembled in their own optical workshop located in the beautiful Port City of Ningbo, China.

Conclusion

My overall conclusion is both filters are superiorly optically and I have absolutely no hesitation in recommending to anyone whether beginners or advanced and using for my own portfolio.

I hope this provides you with some useful information. Please feel free to ask me any questions.

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If you would like to see more of my work;
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“All rights reserved” © Jenny Cameron 2019

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