Professional Landscape Photographer

Posts tagged ‘travel’

Glencoe collection

Clansman ( jpeg for web)

Clansman

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Bidean nam bian

Wanderlust re edit (jpeg for web)

Wanderlust

Glencoe (jpeg)

Greetings

Kingshouse

Kingshouse

Sona (jpeg for web)

Sona

©Jenny Cameron 2017

Euphoria

Glencoe (lge jpeg) (px500)

Spirit

Dreaming (jpeg for web)

Phoenix

©Jenny Cameron 2017

Truly

 

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Eternity

 

Hebrides collection

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Rituals

 

©Jenny Cameron 2017

Cridh

 

Seumas (jpeg)

Seumas

 

©Jenny Cameron 2017

Sgurr nan Gillean

Immortality

Immortality

 

Fairyland (i)

Fairyland

 

Ethereal

Ethereal

 

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Alfheim

 

©Jenny Cameron 2017

Neist

Mara

 

Blaven (lge Jpeg for web)

Blaven

 

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Sacrifice

 

©Jenny Cameron 2017

Escapology 

 

Labyrinth (jpeg)

Labyrinth

 

Eilean Siar (jpeg for web)

Eilean Siar

 

Book release ~ Free to read

At the moment we all have a lot of spare time. Why not take a look at some lovely landscape images from seven different photographers including myself which will teleport you to a new world of beauty. Most importantly it’s FREE to read so why not? Landscapes 2020 volume 12

march 2020 landscapes volume 12

If you’d like to purchase the book please contact me @ Facebook Messenger for further details. I’ve bought a couple of these books in the past & can assure you they are the best quality and beautifully created. This is the fourth book I’ve done under this Publisher (WePhoto).

Haida Picture Appreciation – January 2020

Haida Picture Appreciation

On arrival the light was bouncing all over the place, it had been one of those typical Scottish days where you get all four seasons in one day, this can prove to be very successful for landscape photography as it seems to bring the purest of light, what I call “sparkling- light”. However, this can bring difficulties with light management -You need to be in control of the light, not the light controlling the image. To do this I used a Haida M10 CPL which is my go to filter to control highlights and Haida Red Diamond Medium 0.9 ( 3stops) which produced some real magic. The Callanish stones no matter how many times I visit never fail to make the hairs on the back of my neck stand up, there’s something very spooky but quietly spiritual about it, makes you think about the history which dates back to the stone age over 5000 years ago. The sky didn’t pop as much as I hoped due to the time of year and day time temperatures. I stayed till dusk watching the sun dip below the horizon, all very peaceful at such an iconic location.

lightroom without jpeg

Without filter -ISO 100, F11, 1/25

lightroom with filter

With Red Diamond medium 0.9 and M10 round “drop-in” CPL = ISO 100, F11, 1”3 sec @16mm

lightroom edited jpeg

Post processed in Adobe Creative Cloud

Camera settings Without filters = ISO 100, F11, 1/25 – With Red Diamond medium 0.9 and M10 round “drop-in” CPL = ISO 100, F11, 1”3 sec @16mm. Canon 5d mark iv, Canon 16-35mm L lens, Gitzo tripod & ball head.

I hope this provides you some useful information. Please feel free to ask me any questions. More info and my test reviews on Haida’s website.

If you would like to see more of my work;
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Hebridean headspace

Born and raised on the west coast of England but never felt that inner something with seascapes the way mountains affected me.

However…the coastlines of the Hebrides have such a special type of light, it’s very different to mainland, almost purer, more magical with extra sparkles. The skyscapes alone are enough to make an exceptional composition of their own in a hauntingly beautiful manner.

Makes you feel like it’s got you snuggled up in the most fluffy goose down jacket in the coldest of winter. My eyes are peeled, constantly searching for pockets of light, unusual compositions, wildlife focal points, shapes/patterns. The diversity with its hidden coves, brooding skies, windswept moorland, pristine beaches, textures of the machir where orchids are known to grow, narrow twisty turvy roads and interesting mountains, such a feast for the eyes and a way to fine tune my compositional skills.

Highland cows, sheep and wild ponies roam the beaches and roads. Walks become slower the longer you stay. I’ve done all the tourist trap locations and now prefer to find my own hidden gems for more heart warming feelings.

When your photographing the same locations and even compositions as everyone else it can soon become unsatisfying and boring. Whereas when I find my own beauty spots I can put more emotion into the final image, inviting the viewer right into the moment along me. Post processing is more enjoyable as you find yourself with more creative licence which is something I do enjoy.

My images helped guide me. Life can be tough with many rocks in the road often leading to a bumpy ride. So, if your feeling gloom and down beat go chase some light, free yourself from the daily grime. Let your emotions rule your actions, don’t follow the rules, make them up yourself, listen to your heart.

Don’t follow the crowds, be who you are.. Be different, unique, your own person, don’t worry what others may think of you. Express your emotions, don’t be afraid of looking like a fool. You’ll probably find that most people will admire any faults as it proves your only human, we aren’t perfect.

If you would like to see more of my work;
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Clear Night filter by Haida

Introduction

I’ve been curious for some time now – If I’m being honest slightly sceptical – about whether the Clear Night filter actually worked and wanted to find out for myself if this filter really did what it claimed. Initially, I questioned why can’t you simply change the white balance in post production, what’s all the fuss about? Let me walk you through my honest, hand-on-heart evaluation of the Haida M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter.
Firstly, I’ll start by explaining a bit about the Haida M10 round “drop-in” filters which are dedicated to only the Haida M10 filter holder and released in January 2019. They come in a wide range of sizes to fit most popular lenses in sizes 49, 52, 55, 58, 62, 67, 72, 77 and 82mm. Boasting a choice of Neutral Density filters ( 3, 6, 10 and 15 stops), Circular Polariser, Clear Night, Graduated Neutral Density filters (3 and 4 stops) and ND + CPL combi ( 3 and 6 stops). Inserting the filter into the M10 filter holder couldn’t be easier, it simply drops between the holder and lens, creating a perfect seal from any stray light with its inbuilt light barrier. If you’d like to learn more about the Haida M10 filter holder please feel free to read my in depth test review and video click here. It’s almost like gravity does the work for you, so effortless – once you hear the click it’s locked in place.

If you don’t have the M10 filter holder but would like to try the Haida Clear Night filter, you can purchase the Haida Nano Pro 100 series Clear Night filter 100mm x 100mm, 2 mm in thickness, compatible with many of the most popular 100mm filter holders, including the Haida 100-Pro Filter Holder, and the Lee FK Foundation Kit Filter Holder.

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Location and Equipment

This test review was based on a couple of locations in the Scottish Highlands – Using my Canon 5d mark iv ( full frame camera), Canon 16-35mm F2.8 USM L lens, Gitzo tripod, Gitzo ball head and remote trigger. Although I was in a remote area with class one bortel for my seascape image there were still farms and houses dotted around which caused slight light pollution. The second image of the Church had extreme light pollution at the side of a busy main road and class four bortel.

How the Haida Clear- night filter affected my image.

My main goal in testing any filter will always be for neutrality and sharpness. I want it to replicate what my eyes saw without any strange colour cast which has been an issue for me in the past with a couple of other filter brands. I was experimenting with different exposure times without a filter to achieve the best focus and placement of stars to begin with but never completely happy. However, as soon as I popped on the Haida Clear Night filter everything changed and I was smiling from ear to ear. Instant clarity, almost like a polarising effect which replicated what I was actually viewing, incredible true to life colours and rid of the horrible warm tones which you can easily see in the raw files below. The sky appears clearer and stars intensify with the filter on. It significantly improved the optical clarity, contrast, colour and quality throughout the whole image not to mention unbelievable sharpness and no vignetting which made me feel elated. This was great and super easy to use combined with the Haida M10 filter holder which is a dream to use.

The Haida M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter made terrific improvements blocking the yellow sodium-vapor light which is the horrible yellow/orange coloured casts often generated from light pollution in the night sky resulting in a lovely cool tone which is something I prefer to portray on a cold dark night. This also made my post processing super easy and fast.

Design and construction

I particularly liked the design of the plastic holder that the round glass sits in, making it ultra easy to drop in and remove from the filter holder without any disturbance to the composition even with clumsy gloves on and numb fingers. Constructed from high quality optical glass providing the best ever clarity. Each filter has ten layers of anti-reflective coatings of ultra thin Nano coatings on both sides. Waterproof, meaning any built up condensation from the cold literally rolls off like beads with a quick wipe of a soft microfiber lens cloth, no ugly smears and also scratch-proof. Most importantly for me, preserves image sharpness, which let me tell you is second to none. As with all of the M10 filter range it has a built-in light gasket which seals to the M10 Holder and prevents any unwanted light leakage.

Images below showing straight-out-of-camera (Canon 5d mark iv and Canon 16-35mm USM L Lens) @16mm -With-without-M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter. No post processing on either. Demonstrating how the filter has retained every bit of sharpness and made the stars pop straight off the night sky with a stunning cool tone.

without-filter-for-review-(Tiff)

Without filter ISO 2500, F2.8, 20 seconds . With M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter ISO 2500, F2.8, 22 seconds.

                       Finally post processed in Adobe Creative Cloud.

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Location- County of Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

…………………………………………………

Images below showing straight-out-of-camera (Canon 5d mark iv and Canon 16-35mm USM L Lens) @16mm -With-without-M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter. No post processing on either and the same white balance on both.

without-filter-tiff

Without filter ISO 3200, F2.8, 15 seconds . With M10 round “drop-in” Clear Night filter ISO 3200, F2.8, 15 seconds.

                    Finally post processed in Adobe Creative Cloud

©Jenny Cameron 2019

Location – West coast of Scotland.

Where are the filters assembled

All Haida filters are assembled in their own optical workshop located in the beautiful Port City of Ningbo, China.

Where can I purchase this filter from

All the Haida equipment I’ve mentioned above can be purchased direct from Haida’s European distributor Haida Germany shop  for excellent service.

Conclusion

Overall this will remain in my filter case and used in absolutely every night sky I shoot. Im super impressed the way it added a further dimension to my night photography and would highly recommend to a friend. The M10 round “drop-in” Clear night filter is the perfect companion for night skies, don’t leave home without it. Thank you Haida for saving the day yet again for me.

I hope this provides you some useful information. Please feel free to ask me any questions. More info and my test reviews on Haida’s website.

If you would like to see more of my work;
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“All rights reserved” © Jenny Cameron 2019.

Haida Red-diamond Reverse graduated ND 0.6 filter

Welcome to my test review of the Haida Red-diamond Reverse Graduated neutral density 0.6 (2stops) filter. Using a Canon 5d mark iv ( full frame camera),  Canon 16-35 mm USM L lens, Haida M10 filter holder, Gitzo tripod and ball head.

Over the past three weeks I’ve really put this filter through its paces especially on the beach with sand blowing around & enjoyed every single minute with it. My first shoot was on the remote Scottish island of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides & then finally back on the mainland in the northern county of Caithness. I really wanted to spend time to see how versatile this filter really is. Both these locations were ideal as the island has countless seascapes & Caithness is very flat which suits the filter as nothing to break the horizon line, ie ..mountains, trees etc.

First impression

The filter was presented in a sturdy metal tin with foam insert for protection & lovely chunky cut out which makes it easy to open even with gloves on. One thing I must not forget to mention is how every piece of equipment from Haida, whether its a glass filter or simple adapter ring that I own is always first class, thoughtfully designed & perfect partner for the discerning photographer. Even the smallest of detail, having the particular filter type etched on the top so when their all in your filter case it’s easy to see which filter you wish to select. 

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What’s the difference between a graduated neutral density filter & a reverse graduated neutral density filter?

A graduated neutral density filter is dark at the top where you would place over the sky & gradually reduces its density towards the bottom. Whereas a reverse graduated neutral density filter works on the principle when shooting sunrise/sunset, the highest luminance is near the horizon line. Therefore, the filter needs to be the darkest in the centre region resulting in more detail of the highlights & providing excellent exposure control.

As you can see in the image below, the bottom of the filter is totally clear and the top of the filter comes with a smooth/ gentle transition between the dark & clear areas of the filter which gives a natural balanced exposure & better quality/cleaner image. This would be difficult to replicate in Lightroom with the use of a gradient filter as you need it to be graduated in both directions. I could bracket my shots but it’s much nicer  achieving it as near perfect in camera than having to sit at my computer all day.

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Where to position the filter?

Positioning the filter is imperative, you need to be quite precise by placing it just over the most highlighted areas around the horizon line. Thankfully having it sized 150mm on its longest edge gives more scope & easy to use as you can move it up or down very smoothly till your satisfied with the correct position, as shown in the video below.

Downside

One major potential problem when using the Reverse graduated ND filter is anything that seriously breaks the horizon, be it some headland, mountain, building or tree is going to get very dark quickly, because the darkest part of the filter is right on the horizon transition area. However for many seascape purposes where the horizon is often flat out to sea this is perfect harmony & a feast for the eyes.

Red-diamond series

The Red Diamond series is my favourite of all Haida filters, the quality is second to none, not that the other Haida series aren’t, it’s just something about Red-diamond that I favour & suits my style. This particular filter I’ve tested is a Reverse graduated ND filter, made from K9 optical glass which is double the strength of normal glass, including an ultra-thin Nano multi coating for extra protection. Along with being shock/scratch resistant, waterproof, oil and fingerprint proof. This made my job at the beach with sand blowing all over the filter very easy to wipe off with a microfiber cloth.

Oftentimes with some filter brands you can get strange colour transitions whereas with this filter there was absolutely no evidence, revealing nothing but true colour & neautraly. You may think with all these features within the glass that optically the sharpness will be compromised, let me assure you and see for yourself from the raw files provided every image is pin sharp from corner to corner with excellent light transmission qualities.

Rectangle in shape 100mm x 150mm, 2mm in thickness providing more flexibility to move the filter up or down.  The M10 filter holder geniusly rotates independently, in effect you could turn the filter sideways for more creativity, which I demonstrate in this video. 

Also compatible with the Haida 100-Pro filter holder and other brands the same size. I use the Haida M10 filter holder whereby the Red- diamond series of filters are slotted into the front section. Not to mention the added touch of the R5 rounded corners makes it easier to slide in and out of the filter holder, no sharp corners to cut your fingers. You may have seen online the Haida Red Diamond drop test video? Where it’s thrown onto a concrete floor and no sign of damage to the filter. If you are accident prone this would be the perfect filter series for you.

Conclusion

I have tested this filter at different focal lengths & found the image quality second to none. Fundamentally I’m besotted, its now my secret weapon of choice & will always have a forever home in my filter case.

Images below showing straight-out-of-camera (Canon 5d mark iv and Canon 16-35mm USM L Lens) @20mm -With-without-M10 round “drop-in” reverse graduated neutral density filter. No post processing on either.

use-this-as-without-filter-rgnd

Without filter = ISO 100, F8, 1/2 second – With Haida Red-diamond reverse graduated neutral density filter 0.6 = ISO 100, F8, 2 seconds @20mm.

                                Finally post processed in Adobe Creative Cloud

Loch More sunset (jpeg)

Sunset over Caithness, mainland Scotland.

Images below showing straight-out-of-camera (Canon 5d mark iv and Canon 16-35mm USM L Lens) @21mm -With-without-M10 round “drop-in” reverse graduated neutral density filter. No post processing on either.

without-rev-grad-filter-(1-of-1)

Without filter = ISO 100, F11, 1/250 second – With Haida Red-diamond reverse graduated neutral density filter 0.6 = ISO 100, F11, 1/60 second @21mm.

                                Finally post processed in Adobe Creative Cloud

final edit (jpeg)

Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides. Scotland.

Images below showing straight-out-of-camera (Canon 5d mark iv and Canon 16-35mm USM L Lens) @30mm -With-without-M10 round “drop-in” reverse graduated neutral density filter. No post processing on either. Location; Caithness, mainland Scotland.

Gif

Without filter = ISO 100, F11, 1/15 second – With Haida Red-diamond reverse graduated neutral density filter 0.6= ISO 100, F11, 1/4 second @20mm.

                                  Finally post processed in Adobe Creative Cloud

edited jpeg

Sunset over Caithness, mainland Scotland.

 

I hope this provides you some useful information. Please feel free to ask me any questions. More information & my test reviews on Haida’s website.

If you would like to see more of my work;
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“All rights reserved” © Jenny Cameron 2019

Filter case for Haida M10 100x100mm & 100x150mm filters

Welcome to my test review of the Haida filter case for their M10 filter series or other branded filters of the same dimensions; either 100x100mm &/or 100x150mm. Holding up to nine filters including Haida M10 filter holder, adapter ring, cleaning cloth & memory cards.

When I first started using filters I never had a case to keep them in which meant using individual tins or cases they arrived in. As my collection increased this really started to annoy me having to faff around often in cold, wet, windy conditions routing through my rucksack searching for the correct filter, this drove me insane! For me personally, landscape photography is a calming influence. I enjoy taking my time & slowing down from “life”, I needed to refine this stressful situation as much as possible. Eventually, I purchased the Lee filter field pouch which stayed with me for a few years as there was no other option available from what I found online here in the UK. It had several filter slots but no space for the holder which meant I had to start adapting & let me tell you sewing is not my fortay. Sure it worked but became very cramped & not ideal.

I’ve been an Ambassador for Haida filters for almost two years now & always mentioned my frustrations regarding a filter case. To my joy this year they released their M10 filter case. This was music to my ears, just what I’ve been searching for all these years. One thing I will say about Haida is they listen to their customers & are photographers themselves which provides them with a better understanding of reality in the field.

Which would you rather have?

All the tins & cases clattering around, not knowing what filter is in each tin? Or, the whole lot in one neat accessible filter pouch? All Haida filters have the name of the particular filter etched on the top, making this super easy to simply flick through & make a selection of your choice.

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Different ways

It fits onto your rucksack waist belt with a super strong wide velcro strap & a small clip for added security. Or, if your like me & don’t want the added weight of carrying your rucksack around all the time you can attach it to your trouser belt. Another way, if you don’t wear belts you can easily thread a long strap through & wear it loosely across your body. Final option, simply hang it on your tripod & secure with the small clip. It really is very versatile.

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Construction

Externally the pouch is made from a strong nylon type fabric making this waterproof, moisture proof & extremely durable. There are two easy to grip red zippers externally, one for the main compartment where your filters are housed is made from a soft fleece fabric, ensuring your filters are kept safe from any scratches or knocks. Within this compartment there is a small red zipped section where I keep my memory cards. The second external zipper on the front of the pouch is a padded pocket where I keep a large lens cleaning cloth as seen in the video & photos below.

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Conclusion

In a nutshell I’m thrilled with everything about this pouch. As always with Haida equipment, quality never fails & well thought out. A great solution for any outdoor photographer at an affordable price.

Purchase direct from Haida’s European distributor Haida Germany shop  for excellent service.

I hope this provides you some useful information. Please feel free to ask me any questions. For more info & my test reviews on Haida’s website.

If you would like to see more of my work;
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“All rights reserved” © Jenny Cameron 2019

 

 

Rituals

Interview with Ole Henrik Skjelstad

I’ve known Ole Henrik a few years now, he needs no introduction to anyone in the Landscape Photography world. If you haven’t seen his work, seriously …do look him up. One of my biggest landscape photography inspirations and a genuine human being.

“Jenny’s story is a compelling read about dedication, hardships and overcoming obstacles. She is a true artist whose images stand out as unique, creative and evocative”.

Have a wee read & please let me know.

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Tell us a little about yourself.

Born and raised in the north of England, moved to the Scottish Highlands in my mid 30s with husband and two dogs following our dream to escape the rat race. We live on a farm within a private highland estate in the far north –  I really have never lived anywhere so beautiful in all my life. Always been a bit of a dolly daydreamer. My senior school was set in a rural location with views down a pretty valley and my step father once told a teacher that I’d never get any work done for staring out of the classroom window in my own little world. He was not wrong! I’m a very competitive person but only with myself, I am my own biggest critic, never happy with my images.

 What made you start out with landscape photography?

I’ve always had a passion for the great outdoors and travel, and most of our holidays and free time were either spent long distance backpacking, hiking, climbing or skiing. Unfortunately I was diagnosed with a rare bone disease aged 35 which put an end to our adventures and I spiralled into a dark place. A few years later I found solace taking photos whilst walking my dogs in the beautiful countryside where I was lucky enough to be living, using a basic point/ shoot camera. I finally took the plunge and purchased my first Canon DSLR in October 2015.

What do you want to communicate through your photos?

I try to communicate depth by means of interesting foreground, textures, light, different focal lengths and focus. Emotion is never far from my mind when processing, which I hope is something I manage to convey in my photographs. Oftentimes, I will use more warmer palettes to portray happiness whereas more moody cool tones can show the opposite. I never set out with a plan, I kind of go with the flow wherever my mood takes me. I truly find great pleasure inviting the viewer into the scene and the world through my eyes.

What has photography done for you?

It’s helped me with mental negative demons, and in a way it’s given me back the old part of my life in the great outdoors without debilitating hip pain. Whether I’m on location or post processing, it will take me to another world. I’m not sure if others will relate to this but it’s like I’m able to escape the chaos of life and zone out in my own little world. Not to mention the genuine friendships I’ve made through photography, the generosity I’ve encountered continually astounds me.

How would you describe your work, and how has it evolved since you started out?

As much as I’m known for a lot of post processing, I do feel over the years I’ve learnt to tone it down a wee bit. In the early days I thought saturation and heavy vignettes were the best thing ever, whereas these days I try to be more selective and use it to lead the eye into key areas. Studying light has been a game changer for me, knowing where your light source is and where the light / shadows will fall is a must. I’ve learnt a lot just by spending time in nature – you soon learn what colours work best … you can’t beat nature’s own colour wheel. Also I give myself more time these day on composition, searching for patterns and leading lines, whereas I never use to give it much thought.

I suppose most of us have periods when we seem to lose the fun of photography. Have you developed any strategies to keep the fire burning?

Absolutely! There are most definitely times when this happens, I need time away mostly from my computer and usually spend extra time on family road trips. Especially to the west coast of Scotland – famous for rain but once it stops and the sun comes out there is such amazing light playing on the land that it’s hard not to feel exhilarated and then I can’t get the camera out fast enough! It’s like an itch that needs scratching and I’m back before I know it. I’m very fortunate to have such a supportive husband, he understands when these times happen but will never let me give up when I’m throwing a tantrum (usually in post processing) – he’s always there championing me on which really does help re-igniting the flame.

Have you ever been severely criticized for your work? And in that case how did you handle it?

Oh yes ….!  It sure happens, especially in my early days and I didn’t handle it well emotionally and took it to heart. The purists often criticise my creative licence but I am not here to appease them, my art is selfishly for myself. I’ve learnt over the years to take it with a pinch of salt and move on as photography is subjective and you’ll never satisfy everyone – the world would be a boring place if we all liked the same thing. These days if I see a negative comment on social media I literally ignore it. Gone are the days where I try to reason with them and at the end of the day they are quite entitled to their opinion. After saying that categorically I can say that I’ve never criticise anyone else’s work, even if someone directly asks me for constructive criticism I still struggle, it’s not in my nature. My gran always taught me if you have nothing nice to say then don’t say anything at all. 

Have you any hobbies besides photography?

Not sure if it’s a hobby but it sure takes up time! This past year I’ve thoroughly enjoyed spending time with seven horses on our farm whom I’ve become very attached to and seem to connect with on an emotional level, it’s really quite bizarre in a heartwarming and calming way. Also I enjoy reading and watching far too many films.

In which direction do you believe landscape photography is heading? 

In all honesty reflecting on the past 20 years in the mountains of Scotland I’ve witnessed huge environmental damages. I feel social media is like a virus to landscape photography. So many people travel the globe to iconic places just to post on social media to gain more likes and/or followers, it’s really very sad what’s happening to these beauty spots. Don’t get me wrong-  I accept wholeheartedly that anyone has the right to go where they wish, we’re all guilty of that up to a point. For me travel is about adventure and fun, not letting Google direct you to a location you’ve seen on Instagram. For example 20-30 years ago the famous Fairy Pools on the Isle of Skye only had a few daily hill walkers, there wasn’t even a car park, not many people knew about it, people would simply park on the roadside and for the odd few cars doing this it really didn’t matter. Unlike the past 10 years where it’s snowballed to craziness on a whole new level with endless streams of tour buses all year round. It really hurts me seeing the erosion caused not only to the roads but footpaths too and literally scarring the vistas. I don’t know if people are plain selfish or just don’t realise this damage is permanent! Even if everyone stopped going from today it would take many hundreds of years to return to its former glory. I honestly don’t know where it’ll all end.

What is the most amazing place you have visited? Is it possible for you to articulate why it made such a huge impression on you?

In 1994 my husband and I rented our house out to fund a road trip for a year travelling fourteen countries in Europe and Scandinavia. There was one very special country we never wanted to leave which was Norway, it left a huge impression especially the enormity of the turquoise waterfalls and Troll Wall, such a beautiful country in so many ways. We were able to take our watches off and mostly didn’t know if it was day or night as it was summer time and never went totally dark. 

What inspires you?

It’s got to be the moody Scottish weather. Some say it’s not great due to all the rain but for me there’s nothing better than after heavy rain fall when the sun pops out often revealing great light rays. Also foggy mornings make my heart swell when the mist slowly lifts from a river or loch, it really does make for interesting photography.

You have been severely ill. How has that affected you as a person and your photography?

March 2018 I was diagnosed with Breast Cancer, and my world came crashing down. Photography definitely inspired me to overcome my fears for the biggest fight of my life. My consultant told me I’d be out of action for a year with surgery and treatments. Luckily a few weeks after diagnosis a fine art gallery south of Glasgow approached me to display some of my work. This gave me mental balance, something positive to focus on and true hope. It took a few weeks after surgery to get back to doing some post processing, and I was only able to use one hand. Sadly I wasn’t able to hold my camera, let alone use it as I was so weak and sore. Cancer might have put my life on hold but there was no way it was controlling my love of photography. Within this time I wrote a full post processing tutorial of one of my images from start to finish for a photography magazine and also had a selection of my work published in a hardback coffee table style book.

 Photography helped to shut out the reality of the outside world, and took me to another world full of magic, with a sense of calmness and happiness. It gave me the confidence to hold my head up high, I was alive! No matter what I had to face my escape was always my art, I buried my head in my own little world where anything was possible. Eventually I got through surgery, 5 months of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and albeit a little battered and bruised, I survived! It’s the old cliche that you often hear after a life-changing diagnosis –  “the world looks different now”. It’s so true. Before my diagnosis I would shy away from certain opportunities but now I want to grab life and live it to the fullest. I received many messages of support from fellow photographers who told me their stories of how cancer had touched their families. Photography has been my saviour and still continues to help rebuild “me”.

Do you have a piece of advice for young aspiring landscape photographers?

Be true to yourself, do what makes you happy and don’t worry what others may think. Don’t follow the crowds or chase the followers – it will become stressful and dull your creativity. Take inspiration from others but don’t copy. Try to find your own unique style which in return will give you more abundance. Never compare yourself to others, it’s a slippery slope of despair. Social media can of course be inspirational but at the same time can leave you with a feeling of lacklustre and loneliness and can quickly lead to unhelpful comparisons. If this happens take some time away even if just a couple of hours and do something completely different – for it can suck the life from your creative flow. And finally, practice, practice and more practice, it’s the only way. Oh… and don’t be too hard on yourself –  it’s about having fun!


 

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© Jenny Cameron 2019.

 

 

The Buccal

Buachaille

Glencoe

“The Buccal” …also known as Buachaille Etive Mor. It’s been my playground the past thirty odd years, I know these mountains very well having climbed, back-packed & skied. There will always be something very special deep in my heart that draws me back. For those who have never visited Glencoe/ Rannoch Moor area, let me tell you it’s one of those places your forever looking over your shoulder, not because it’s unsafe but your constantly thinking someone is behind you. Kinda spooky which is of no surprise when you think of the Glencoe massacre 1692 when Clan MacDonald were slaughtered in their sleep!

Glen Etive portrait style waterfall re edit

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